Whitepapers
Rick

Rick

 

This white paper is the third of three parts on the complex functions of brain, what happens when an injury is acquired and how to care for and manage a life-changing brain injury.

BY LINDA SIMMONS, RN BScN
Consultant and Cost of Future Care Expert, Connect Medical Legal Experts

The prehospital care of a patient with a brain injury has a profound impact on the subsequent course of events and outcomes. Prehospital management refers to the initial resuscitation and interventions that stabilize the patient at the scene of the accident and on route to the hospital. Prehospital management requires timely and effective brain resuscitation, as the brain only has minimal reserves to meet ongoing metabolic needs. If resuscitation is insufficient because of reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and decreased oxygen delivery, ischemia and hypoxia develop and can lead to secondary brain injury.

This white paper is the second of three parts on the complex functions of brain, what happens when an injury is acquired and how to care for and manage a life-changing brain injury.

BY LINDA SIMMONS, RN BScN

Consultant and Cost of Future Care Expert, Connect Medical Legal Experts

TBI refers to any injury to the scalp, skull (cranium or facial bones) or the brain. Injury to the brain can be focal or diffuse. Focal injuries result in contusions, lacerations, or hemorrhages. The hemorrhages that can occur are epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, intracerebral hematoma, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The diffuse injury can cause a mild to severe concussion or diffuse axonal injury.

This white paper is the first of three parts on the complex functions of brain, what happens when an injury is acquired and how to care for and manage a life-changing brain injury.

BY LINDA SIMMONS, RN BScN

Senior Nurse Life Care Planner, Connect Medical Legal Experts

This document will increase the health care professionals understanding of Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). ABI is defined as damage to the brain that is acquired after birth. It can affect cognitive, physical, emotional, social, or independent functioning. ABI is an umbrella term used to describe all brain injuries. ABI can result from traumatic brain injury (i.e. accidents, falls, assaults, etc.) and non-traumatic brain injury (i.e. stroke, brain tumours, infection, poisoning, hypoxia, ischemia or substance abuse).

The motor vehicle related accident clients that we at Connect Experts see with ABI have often resulted from a Traumatic Brain Injury and thus ABI’s that have resulted from a TBI will be the focus of this document.

Connect Experts has been voted a preferred Expert Witness Service provider in the medical/legal field by readers of Canadian Lawyer! The publication announced the winners of its third annual Reader's Choice awards today in Toronto. Connect Experts is honoured to be chosen among the top three providers in Canada. Thank you for your support!

Connect Experts is continuing its outreach work in Jamaica by facilitating another medical malpractice case review for a patient. Our CEO Chris Rokosh began working with a contact in the Caribbean nation of two million people in 2012, when a woman approached her at a conference in Atlanta, Ga., seeking help supporting victims of malpractice in the country. 

 

OCTOBER 2, 2017

Thank you for helping us win a Canadian Lawyer Reader's Choice award!

Connect Experts has been voted a top Expert Witness Service provider in the medical/legal field by readers of the national magazine 

The publication announced the winners of its third annual Reader's Choice awards today in Toronto. Connect Experts is honoured to be chosen among the top three providers.

"Thank you for helping Connect Experts to be recognized as a 2017 Reader's Choice Award winner as Canada's top Medical Legal Expert Witness provider," said CEO/founder Chris Rokosh.  

"We're thankful to our lawyer clients and our experts for their continued support in helping us win this award as one of Canada’s preferred expert witness providers in the medical/legal category. We are here because of you, and we share this honour with you.”

The awards are designed to give readers the chance to share who are their preferred vendors and suppliers in the Canadian legal marketplace. In total, more than 300 products and service providers were listed on the official ballot and voters were also given the opportunity to write in any businesses not listed. More than 2,000 readers cast votes for their preferred suppliers and vendors in 38 categories. 

Connect Experts, which Chris founded in 2001, has assisted more than 300 lawyer clients and more than 2,000 personal injury, medical malpractice and class action cases.

You can view the full list of Reader’s Choice winners here:

http://digital.canadianlawyermag.com/i/878159-2017-readers-choice-awards

Connect Experts is in Toronto today to take part in the 'Diversified Litigation Series' seminar, the most talked-about legal event in the city today. Our CEO Chris Rokosh, pictured with Will Davidson LLP partner Paul Cahill, is sharing insights on 'Prosecuting a Medical Malpractice Case: Finding the Right Medical Expert'. Other topics of the day, organized by the dynamic Will Davidson LLP team, include innovations in cyber law, products law and the ethics & legal implications of referral fees. We're so pleased to be included in this prestigious forum!

Connect Experts is continuing its outreach work in Jamaica by facilitating another medical malpractice case review for a patient. Our CEO Chris Rokosh began working with a contact in the Caribbean nation of two million people in 2012, when a woman approached her at a conference in Atlanta, Ga., seeking help supporting victims of malpractice in the country.

Our newest team member brings more than two decades of experience as an RN and a unique combination of specialized healthcare skills to Connect Medical Legal Experts.

Brenda McDonnell, based in Alberta, has worked in the Emergency Department, Medical/Surgical unit, Pediatrics, Long Term Care, Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation, Psychiatry and as a Nursing Supervisor.

Read more about her now.

 

The inside scoop on hospital triage

Connect Experts explores the system used by nurses to assess and priorize ER patients

It’s another packed evening in the hospital emergency room. You’re here with a painful cut on your hand, caused when you grabbed at a razor-sharp piece of falling metal tubing. You can’t help but notice that the busy waiting area is overflowing with patients and worried family members in equally dire straits.

Next to you, a mom sits anxiously with her toddler, whose tears, flushed face and bleary eyes suggest she has a fever. Across the aisle, an elderly man is coughing loudly into a tissue (causing you to secretly hope his illness isn’t contagious).

You’re called by the triage nurse, who tells you your swollen purple index finger should have been stitched days ago. She sends you back to the waiting room, smiling patiently as you ask how long until you see a doctor. “We’ll get you in as soon as possible, we have a lot of sick patients here tonight.”

Now, picture that you are the triage nurse for a moment. How do you determine who goes in next? Over the past 20 minutes alone, the following patients have arrived in the emergency along with the sobbing toddler with a temperature of 39.5C, a heart rate of 120/minute, sore throat and earache:

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